Objections to plan to demolish O'Rahilly house

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Relatives of the signatories of the 1916 Proclamation are among a number of groups to lodge objections to plans by developers to demolish the home of the 1916 Rising leader and ‘noble Gaelic hero’ The O’Rahilly in Dublin.

In May, the McSharry and Kennedy families, owners of the Herbert Park Hotel, lodged fast-track plans with An Bord Pleanála to demolish the home to make way for a €66m 12-storey block that will contain 105 apartments in a project called ’40 Park’ on a site overlooking Herbert Park. 

The plan involves the demolition of number 40 Herbert Park, Ballsbridge, which was the home of Michael Joseph O’Rahilly, known as The O’Rahilly, the only leader of the Rising to die in battle.

The O’Rahilly was the first occupant of number 40 in 1909 and his widow, Nancy, lived there until her death in 1961.

The applicants, Derryroe Ltd, say 40 Herbert Park is not a protected structure and a report commissioned by the applicants “finds that the house itself is not of significant architectural or heritage value”.

However, in response to the proposal, 24 objections have been lodged against the plan including from the Department of Culture and Heritage, An Taisce, the Pembroke Road Residents’ Association, the South Georgian Core Residents’ Association, and parties connected to people involved in the 1916 Rising. 

On behalf of the signatories of the 1916 Proclamation, Helen Litton argues that the house played an important part in the early 20th-century history of the State and should be preserved for future generations. 

She added that as he lay dying after being shot during the Rising, O’Rahilly wrote a letter to Nancy addressed to 40 Herbert Park. 

The Department of Culture says it would welcome a revised plan that includes the retention of the former O’Rahilly home.

Irish Independent

Source: Irish News