Cork-based residential and respite centre failed to notify Hiqa of injuries to residents

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Cork-based residential and respite centre failed to notify Hiqa of injuries to residents
Cork-based residential and respite centre failed to notify Hiqa of injuries to residents

A Cork-based residential and respite centre for adults with physical and sensory disabilities failed to notify the State’s healthcare watchdog about injuries to residents.

The finding was made during an unannounced inspection of Abode (Doorway to Life) Centre in Cork by the Health Information and Quality Authority over two days in May this year.

There was non-compliance with 10 regulations, including not having care plans to meet residents’ health needs and not notifying HIQA about injuries.

There were 12 residents in the centre in Mahon but it took two days for the inspectors to find out exactly how many lived there.

When the inspectors arrived they were told there were 10 individuals but it emerged that there were an additional four residents.

The provider had not ensured that residents were protected from all forms of abuse.

The chief inspector had not been notified in writing about an allegation of abuse and a safeguarding plan had not been put in place to ensure the safety of the resident.

Also, injuries to residents, including bruising and pressure sores, had been documented but the chief inspector had not been informed about them.

It emerged that staff members did not have current training in the prevention, detection and response to abuse.

Inspectors also found shortcomings in the centre’s complaints procedure. One complaint was considered to be behavioural but no behavioural supports had been provided for the resident.

Elsewhere, an inspection of a centre operated by Peamount Healthcare in a rural area in Co Dublin found institutional care practices.

The ‘meaningful activities’ recorded for the 12 residents with intellectual disabilities included completing household chores and fire drills.

Findings made during an unannounced inspection last July were very mixed. While there were examples of good care, there was an “institutional approach” taken in the provision of services.

Some staff wore uniforms and used walkie talkies and there was a high level of staff footfall through residents’ homes that interrupted and limited opportunities for normal living by the residents.

As well as training deficits the inspectors also found that medication management arrangements needed to be reviewed.

In the case of three residents, records were not maintained to show that medications had been administered as prescribed on several occasions.

An unannounced inspection in July of Tigh an Oileain, a residential centre on Valentia Island run by the Kerry Parents and Friends Association, found that it was “effectively and consistently” managed.

The five adult residents that have an intellectual disability are all supported to live meaningful and fulfilling lives based on their skills and choices.

Source: Full Feed